Media

Cynefin: Strategic Understanding with Prof. Dave Snowden





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The beauty of hackers is that they force us to evolve and improve

Keren Elazari at TED – “Why we Need Hackers”

“For the past three decades, hackers have done a lot of things, but they have also impacted civil liberties, innovation and Internet freedom, so I think it’s time we take a good look at how we choose to portray them, because if we keep expecting them to be the bad guys, how can they be the heroes too? My years in the hacker world have made me realize both the problem and the beauty about hackers: They just can’t see something broken in the world and leave it be. They are compelled to either exploit it or try and change it, and so they find the vulnerable aspects in our rapidly changing world. They make us, they force us to fix things or demand something better, and I think we need them to do just that, because after all, it is not information that wants to be free, it’s us.”

(H/T: redteams.net)

#AdaptOrDie

HUMINT Videos and Podcasts

Thought I would share some videos and podcasts that I have recently listened to on the subject of human intelligence (HUMINT) collection and management. All the material is from experienced intelligence practitioners from the government side.

The first of which is from AuroraWDC’s IntelCollab webinar series, and is titled “How Internal Human Intelligence Networks (HUMINT) Develop External Primary Sources”. The guest presenter is Todd Gleghorn, a former Naval Intelligence Officer and current civilian Staff Intelligence Officer at the US Department of Defense.

Learning objectives:

1.    Establishing collection modalities to generate the most ROI for your HUMINT investment
2.    Comparing the traditional HUMINT collection paradigm and considering an alternate paradigm
3.    Learning to methodically map your organization’s Subject Matter Expert (SME) network
4.    Overlay your SME network map with the different organizational lines of effort (LOEs) to begin identifying cross-cueing internal and external collection opportunities

Link to video

I appreciated Todd’s slides on internal network mapping. Network concepts and science has been conspicuously absent from much of the competitive intelligence field – yet at the same time it has come to play a prominent role in government intelligence operations and analysis over the last 15 years. Todd suggests that CI practitioners utilize a program like IBM i2 Analysts Notebook to; I agree, but would note that open-source network analysis and visualization tools like Gephi and Node-XL are more in line with the average CI functions budget.

The second item is a podcast from the The Art of Charm with Robin Dreeke author of “It’s Not All About “Me”: The Top Ten Techniques for Building Quick Rapport with Anyone”, and chief of the FBI’s Counterintelligence Behavioral Analysis Program.

Today, we’ll discuss:

  • Pretty much nothing about being the chief spy catcher for the FBI

  • …and a lot about how to build trust and rapport

  • How to get paranoid/sketchy people to trust you

  • How to refrain from judging others and why this is so powerful

  • Attaining our goals with people in the face of our own emotional resistance

  • How to build tolerance of others avoid becoming collateral damage of other people’s insecurities

I highly recommend both Dreeke’s book and becoming a regular listener of The Art of Charm.

Finally, I recently discovered the YouTube account of author and former CIA officer TJ Waters who is has producing a vlog series on human intelligence and influence.  Waters was actually a competitive intelligence practitioner for years before he joined CIA in the wake of 9/11.

Here are two videos on elicitation techniques from the series: